For Immediate Release

Bayer Data at ASCO 2019 Highlights Commitment to Evolving the Cancer Treatment Paradigm

- Data include new analyses on Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib), with two oral presentations in patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK gene fusion: one on expanded data in pediatric patients and the other on patients with brain metastases or primary central nervous system tumors

- First detailed presentation of quality of life data from the Phase III ARAMIS trial of the investigational androgen receptor antagonist darolutamide in patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

- Oral presentation on investigational ATR inhibitor BAY 1895344 in patients with advanced solid tumors

- Long-term data from patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma treated with Aliqopa™ (copanlisib)

Abstracts: 3122, 6602, 10010, 2006, 5000, 5026, 2522, 11021, 11023, 3121, 10038, 2045, 4083, 11586, 10002, 7553, 6031, 3007, 10515

WHIPPANY, N.J., May 13, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Bayer will present research from its expanding oncology portfolio at the 55th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2019, taking place May 31 to June 4 in Chicago. The presentations highlight new findings from assets on the company's key areas of focus, some of which have the potential to be first-in-class. Bayer already has five marketed compounds across nine indications and is committed to expanding this portfolio by bringing forward valuable additional projects.

(PRNewsfoto/Bayer)

For Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib), findings from four analyses across clinical studies in patients with solid tumors harboring NTRK gene fusions will be presented: one oral presentation on the expanded pediatric dataset, one oral presentation focusing on data from Vitravki in patients with brain metastases or primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors, one poster presentation on patient-reported quality of life outcomes, and one poster presentation on the expanded efficacy and safety data in adult patients.

Vitrakvi was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2018 as the first and only TRK inhibitor exclusively designed for the treatment of adult and pediatric cancer patients with solid tumors with an NTRK gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation that are either metastatic or where surgical resection will likely result in severe morbidity, and have no satisfactory alternative treatments or that have progressed following treatment. In the U.S., Vitrakvi was approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Following the acquisition of Loxo Oncology by Eli Lilly and Company in February 2019, Bayer has obtained the exclusive licensing rights for the global development and commercialization, including in the U.S., for Vitrakvi and the investigational TRK inhibitor BAY 2731954 (previously LOXO-195) progressing through clinical development.

In another oral presentation, new data evaluating the impact of darolutamide on time to pain progression and quality of life outcomes in non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC) patients from the Phase III ARAMIS trial will be presented. The U.S. FDA granted Priority Review and accepted the New Drug Application (NDA) for darolutamide for the treatment of nmCRPC in April 2019. Additionally, Bayer has filed for approval in the European Union (EU) as well as Japan and is also in discussions with other health authorities regarding submissions. Darolutamide, an investigational, non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonist with a distinct chemical structure, is being developed jointly by Bayer and Orion Corporation, a globally operating Finnish pharmaceutical company.

One of Bayer's promising early pipeline projects, an investigational oral ATR inhibitor BAY 1895344, will be featured in an oral presentation discussing results of the first-in-human trial for the compound in patients with advanced solid tumors carrying certain DNA damage response (DDR) defects. The DDR is thought to protect cells from DNA damage and mediates cellular response to endogenous or exogenous stress, with ATR kinase being a key regulator in the DDR network in response to replication stress.1,2 Many cancers harbor certain DDR defects making them potentially more vulnerable to inhibition of DNA repair pathways such as ATR.3

Additional presentations include data from Bayer's approved and pipeline therapies, including real world data for Xofigo® (radium Ra 223 dichloride) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), long-term follow-up data in patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL) treated with AliqopaTM (copanlisib) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data from the REGOMA trial in relapsed glioblastoma patients treated with Stivarga® (regorafenib).

Following is a list of notable oral and poster presentations at ASCO 2019:

Larotrectinib

  • Larotrectinib efficacy and safety in adult TRK fusion cancer patients
    • Poster Presentation #3122, Session: Developmental Therapeutics and Tumor Biology (Nonimmuno)
    • Saturday, June 1, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Patient-reported outcomes from two global multicenter clinical trials of children and adults with tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) fusion cancer receiving larotrectinib
    • Poster Presentation #6602, Session: Health Services Research, Clinical Informatics, and Quality of Care
    • Saturday, June 1, 1:15 PM - 4:15 PM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Larotrectinib efficacy and safety in pediatric TRK fusion cancer patients
    • Oral Presentation #10010, Session: Pediatric Oncology II
    • Sunday, June 2, 8:12 AM - 8:24 AM CDT, Room: S504
  • Activity of larotrectinib in TRK fusion cancer patients with brain metastases or primary central nervous system tumors
    • Oral Presentation #2006, Session: Central Nervous System Tumors
    • Monday, June 3, 3:15 PM - 3:27 PM CDT, Room: S102

Darolutamide

  • Impact of darolutamide (DARO) on pain and quality of life (QoL) in patients (Pts) with nonmetastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC)
    • Oral Presentation #5000, Session: Genitourinary (Prostate) Cancer
    • Friday, May 31, 2:45 PM - 2:57 PM CDT, Room: Arie Crown Theater

Radium-223 Dichloride (radium-223)

  • Concurrent or layered treatment with radium-223 (Ra-223) and enzalutamide (Enza) or abiraterone plus prednisone/prednisolone (Abi/pred): A retrospective study of real-world clinical outcomes in patients (pts) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC)
    • Poster Presentation #5026, Session: Genitourinary (Prostate) Cancer
    • Saturday, June 1, 1:15 PM - 4:15 PM CDT, Room: Hall A

Regorafenib

  • Regorafenib plus nivolumab in patients with advanced gastric (GC) or colorectal cancer (CRC): An open-label, dose-finding, and dose-expansion phase 1b trial (REGONIVO, EPOC1603)
    • Poster Discussion #2522, Session: Developmental Immunotherapy and Tumor Immunobiology
    • Saturday, June 1, 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM CDT, Room: Hall D1
  • A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized phase II trial assessing the activity and safety of regorafenib (REG) in patients (pts) with nonadipocytic soft tissue sarcoma (STS) previously treated with pazopanib (PAZ)
    • Poster Discussion #11021, Session: Sarcoma
    • Saturday, June 1, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM CDT, Room: S404
  • ALT-GIST: Randomised phase II trial of imatinib alternating with regorafenib versus imatinib alone for the first-line treatment of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)
    • Poster Discussion #11023, Session: Sarcoma
    • Saturday, June 1, 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM CDT, Room: S404
  • Accumulation of active metabolite M-2 predicts overall survival (OS) of chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with regorafenib (REGO)
    • Poster Presentation #3121, Session: Developmental Therapeutics and Tumor Biology (Nonimmuno)
    • Saturday, June 1, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Evaluation of the multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib in the Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma in vivo models
    • Poster Presentation #10038, Session: Pediatric Oncology
    • Saturday, June 1, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) evaluation in the REGOMA trial: A randomized, phase II clinical trial analyzing regorafenib activity in relapsed glioblastoma patients
    • Poster Presentation #2045, Session: Central Nervous System Tumors
    • Sunday, June 2, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Final analysis of phase II trial of regorafenib (REG) in refractory advanced biliary cancers (BC)
    • Poster Presentation #4083, Session: Gastrointestinal (Noncolorectal) Cancer
    • Monday, June 3, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Preemptive versus reactive topical clobetasol for regorafenib-induced hand-foot reactions: Results from the ReDOS trial
    • Poster Presentation #11586, Session: Symptoms and Survivorship
    • Monday, June 3, 1:15 PM - 4:15 PM CDT, Room: Hall A

Sorafenib

  • Effect of intensification of induction II chemotherapy and liberalization of stem cell donor source on outcome for children with high risk acute myeloid leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group
    • Oral Presentation #10002, Session: Pediatric Oncology I
    • Friday, May 31, 3:33 PM - 3:45 PM CDT, Room: S504

Copanlisib

  • Long-term follow-up of patients (pts) with relapsed or refractory (r/r) follicular lymphoma (FL) treated with copanlisib
    • Poster Presentation #7553, Session: Hematologic Malignancies—Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
    • Monday, June 3, 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM CDT, Room: Hall A
  • Preclinical efficacy of copanlisib in cetuximab sensitive and resistant tumors of HNSCC
    • Poster Presentation #6031, Session: Head and Neck Cancer
    • Saturday, June 1, 1:15 PM - 4:15 PM CDT, Room: Hall A

BAY 1895344

  • First-in-human trial of the oral ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) inhibitor BAY 1895344 in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumors
    • Oral Presentation #3007, Session: Developmental Therapeutics and Tumor Biology (Nonimmuno)
    • Monday, June 3, 10:12 AM - 10:24 AM CDT, Room: S406

Medical Education (non-CME)

  • ASCO Direct GU: A multistakeholder blended-learning project to make global education local
    • Poster Presentation #10515, Session: Educational Research and Professional Development
    • Saturday, June 1, 1:15 PM - 4:15 PM CDT, Room: Hall A

About Darolutamide
Darolutamide is an investigational, non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonist with a distinct chemical structure that binds to the receptor and exhibits antagonistic activity, thereby it is thought to inhibit the receptor function and the growth of prostate cancer cells. A Phase III study in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (ARASENS) is ongoing. Information about these trials can be found at www.clinicaltrials.gov

Darolutamide is not approved by the U.S. FDA, the European Medicines Agency or any other health authority.

About Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) 
Vitrakvi® is indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with solid tumors that have an NTRK gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation that are either metastatic or where surgical resection will likely result in severe morbidity, and have no satisfactory alternative treatments or that have progressed following treatment.4 This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

Research suggests that the NTRK gene can become abnormally fused to other genes, producing a TRK fusion protein that can act as an oncogenic driver, promoting cell growth and survival in tumor cell lines.4

Important Safety Information for VITRAKVI® (larotrectinib)

Neurotoxicity: Among the 176 patients who received VITRAKVI, neurologic adverse reactions of any grade occurred in 53% of patients, including Grade 3 and Grade 4 neurologic adverse reactions in 6% and 0.6% of patients, respectively. The majority (65%) of neurological adverse reactions occurred within the first three months of treatment (range 1 day to 2.2 years). Grade 3 neurologic adverse reactions included delirium (2%), dysarthria (1%), dizziness (1%), gait disturbance (1%), and paresthesia (1%). Grade 4 encephalopathy (0.6%) occurred in a single patient. Neurologic adverse reactions leading to dose modification included dizziness (3%), gait disturbance (1%), delirium (1%), memory impairment (1%), and tremor (1%).4

Advise patients and caretakers of these risks with VITRAKVI. Advise patients not to drive or operate hazardous machinery if they are experiencing neurologic adverse reactions. Withhold or permanently discontinue VITRAKVI based on the severity. If withheld, modify the VITRAKVI dose when resumed.4

Hepatotoxicity: Among the 176 patients who received VITRAKVI, increased transaminases of any grade occurred in 45%, including Grade 3 increased AST or ALT in 6% of patients. One patient (0.6%) experienced Grade 4 increased ALT. The median time to onset of increased AST was 2 months (range: 1 month to 2.6 years). The median time to onset of increased ALT was 2 months (range: 1 month to 1.1 years). Increased AST and ALT leading to dose modifications occurred in 4% and 6% of patients, respectively. Increased AST or ALT led to permanent discontinuation in 2% of patients.4

Monitor liver tests, including ALT and AST, every 2 weeks during the first month of treatment, then monthly thereafter, and as clinically indicated. Withhold or permanently discontinue VITRAKVI based on the severity. If withheld, modify the VITRAKVI dosage when resumed.4

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: VITRAKVI can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Larotrectinib resulted in malformations in rats and rabbits at maternal exposures that were approximately 11- and 0.7-times, respectively, those observed at the clinical dose of 100 mg twice daily.4

Advise women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use an effective method of contraception during treatment and for 1 week after the final dose of VITRAKVI.4

Most Common Adverse Reactions (≥20%): The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) were: increased ALT (45%), increased AST (45%), anemia (42%), fatigue (37%), nausea (29%), dizziness (28%), cough (26%), vomiting (26%), constipation (23%), and diarrhea (22%).4 

Drug Interactions: Avoid coadministration of VITRAKVI with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (including grapefruit or grapefruit juice), strong CYP3A4 inducers (including St. John's wort), or sensitive CYP3A4 substrates. If coadministration of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers cannot be avoided, modify the VITRAKVI dose as recommended. If coadministration of sensitive CYP3A4 substrates cannot be avoided, monitor patients for increased adverse reactions of these drugs.4

Lactation: Advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with VITRAKVI and for 1 week after the final dose.4

Please see the full Prescribing Information for VITRAKVI® (larotrectinib).

About Xofigo® (radium Ra 223 dichloride) Injection5
Xofigo is indicated for the treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastatic disease.

Important Safety Information for Xofigo® (radium Ra 223 dichloride) Injection
Contraindications: Xofigo® is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. Xofigo can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman

Warnings and Precautions:

  • Bone Marrow Suppression: In the phase 3 ALSYMPCA trial, 2% of patients in the Xofigo arm experienced bone marrow failure or ongoing pancytopenia, compared to no patients treated with placebo. There were two deaths due to bone marrow failure. For 7 of 13 patients treated with Xofigo bone marrow failure was ongoing at the time of death. Among the 13 patients who experienced bone marrow failure, 54% required blood transfusions. Four percent (4%) of patients in the Xofigo arm and 2% in the placebo arm permanently discontinued therapy due to bone marrow suppression. In the randomized trial, deaths related to vascular hemorrhage in association with myelosuppression were observed in 1% of Xofigo-treated patients compared to 0.3% of patients treated with placebo. The incidence of infection-related deaths (2%), serious infections (10%), and febrile neutropenia (<1%) was similar for patients treated with Xofigo and placebo. Myelosuppression–notably thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, pancytopenia, and leukopenia–has been reported in patients treated with Xofigo

    Monitor patients with evidence of compromised bone marrow reserve closely and provide supportive care measures when clinically indicated. Discontinue Xofigo in patients who experience life-threatening complications despite supportive care for bone marrow failure

  • Hematological Evaluation: Monitor blood counts at baseline and prior to every dose of Xofigo. Prior to first administering Xofigo, the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) should be ≥1.5 × 109/L, the platelet count ≥100 × 109/L, and hemoglobin ≥10 g/dL. Prior to subsequent administrations, the ANC should be ≥1 × 109/L and the platelet count ≥50 × 109/L. Discontinue Xofigo if hematologic values do not recover within 6 to 8 weeks after the last administration despite receiving supportive care

  • Concomitant Use With Chemotherapy: Safety and efficacy of concomitant chemotherapy with Xofigo have not been established. Outside of a clinical trial, concomitant use of Xofigo in patients on chemotherapy is not recommended due to the potential for additive myelosuppression. If chemotherapy, other systemic radioisotopes, or hemibody external radiotherapy are administered during the treatment period, Xofigo should be discontinued

  • Increased Fractures and Mortality in Combination With Abiraterone Plus Prednisone/Prednisolone: Xofigo is not recommended for use in combination with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone/prednisolone outside of clinical trials. At the primary analysis of the phase 3 ERA-223 study that evaluated concurrent initiation of Xofigo in combination with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone/prednisolone in 806 asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic mCRPC patients, an increased incidence of fractures (28.6% vs 11.4%) and deaths (38.5% vs 35.5%) have been observed in patients who received Xofigo in combination with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone/prednisolone compared to patients who received placebo in combination with abiraterone acetate plus prednisone/prednisolone. Safety and efficacy with the combination of Xofigo and agents other than gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have not been established

Administration and Radiation Protection: Xofigo should be received, used, and administered only by authorized persons in designated clinical settings. The administration of Xofigo is associated with potential risks to other persons from radiation or contamination from spills of bodily fluids such as urine, feces, or vomit. Therefore, radiation protection precautions must be taken in accordance with national and local regulations

Fluid Status: Dehydration occurred in 3% of patients on Xofigo and 1% of patients on placebo. Xofigo increases adverse reactions such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, which may result in dehydration. Monitor patients' oral intake and fluid status carefully and promptly treat patients who display signs or symptoms of dehydration or hypovolemia

Injection Site Reactions: Erythema, pain, and edema at the injection site were reported in 1% of patients on Xofigo

Secondary Malignant Neoplasms: Xofigo contributes to a patient's overall long-term cumulative radiation exposure. Long-term cumulative radiation exposure may be associated with an increased risk of cancer and hereditary defects. Due to its mechanism of action and neoplastic changes, including osteosarcomas, in rats following administration of radium-223 dichloride, Xofigo may increase the risk of osteosarcoma or other secondary malignant neoplasms. However, the overall incidence of new malignancies in the randomized trial was lower on the Xofigo arm compared to placebo (<1% vs 2%; respectively), but the expected latency period for the development of secondary malignancies exceeds the duration of follow-up for patients on the trial

Subsequent Treatment With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy: In the randomized clinical trial, 16% of patients in the Xofigo group and 18% of patients in the placebo group received cytotoxic chemotherapy after completion of study treatments. Adequate safety monitoring and laboratory testing was not performed to assess how patients treated with Xofigo will tolerate subsequent cytotoxic chemotherapy

Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) in the Xofigo arm vs the placebo arm, respectively, were nausea (36% vs 35%), diarrhea (25% vs 15%), vomiting (19% vs 14%), and peripheral edema (13% vs 10%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were reported in 57% of Xofigo-treated patients and 63% of placebo-treated patients. The most common hematologic laboratory abnormalities in the Xofigo arm (≥10%) vs the placebo arm, respectively, were anemia (93% vs 88%), lymphocytopenia (72% vs 53%), leukopenia (35% vs 10%), thrombocytopenia (31% vs 22%), and neutropenia (18% vs 5%)

Please see the full Prescribing Information for Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride).

About AliqopaTM (copanlisib) Injection6
Aliqopa (copanlisib) is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL) who have received at least two prior systemic therapies.

Accelerated approval was granted for this indication based on overall response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contigent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Aliqopa is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) with inhibitory activity predominantly against PI3K-α and PI3K-δ isoforms expressed in malignant B cells. Aliqopa has been shown to induce tumor cell death by apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation of primary malignant B cell lines. Aliqopa inhibits several key cell-signaling pathways, including B-cell receptor signaling, CXCR12 mediated chemotaxis of malignant B cells, and NFκB signaling in lymphoma cell lines.

The broad clinical development program for copanlisib also includes ongoing Phase III studies in indolent NHL (iNHL) patients who have relapsed or are refractory to prior therapies. The CHRONOS-3 Phase III study is evaluating copanlisib in combination with rituximab in relapsed iNHL and the CHRONOS-4 Phase III study is evaluating copanlisib in combination with standard immunochemotherapy in relapsed iNHL. More information about these trials can be found at www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Important Safety Information for Aliqopa (copanlisib) Injection

Infections: Serious, including fatal, infections occurred in 19% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. The most common serious infection was pneumonia. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of infection and withhold ALIQOPA for Grade 3 and higher infection.

Serious pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) infection occurred in 0.6% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. Before initiating treatment with ALIQOPA, consider PJP prophylaxis for populations at risk.  Withhold ALIQOPA in patients with suspected PJP infection of any grade. If confirmed, treat infection until resolution, then resume ALIQOPA at previous dose with concomitant PJP prophylaxis.

Hyperglycemia: Grade 3 or 4 hyperglycemia (blood glucose 250 mg/dL or greater) occurred in 41% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. Serious hyperglycemic events occurred in 2.8% of patients. Treatment with ALIQOPA may result in infusion-related hyperglycemia. Blood glucose levels typically peaked 5 to 8 hours post-infusion and subsequently declined to baseline levels for a majority of patients; blood glucose levels remained elevated in 17.7% of patients one day after ALIQOPA infusion. Of 155 patients with baseline HbA1c <5.7%, 16 (10%) patients had HbA1c >6.5% at the end of treatment.

Of the twenty patients with diabetes mellitus treated in CHRONOS-1, seven developed Grade 4 hyperglycemia and two discontinued treatment. Patients with diabetes mellitus should only be treated with ALIQOPA following adequate glucose control and should be monitored closely. Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of hyperglycemia.

Achieve optimal blood glucose control before starting each ALIQOPA infusion. Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of hyperglycemia.

Hypertension: Grade 3 hypertension (systolic 160 mmHg or greater or diastolic 100 mmHg or greater) occurred in 26% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. Serious hypertensive events occurred in 0.9% of 317 patients. Treatment with ALIQOPA may result in infusion-related hypertension. The mean change of systolic and diastolic BP from baseline to 2 hours post-infusion on Cycle 1 Day 1 was 16.8 mmHg and 7.8 mmHg, respectively. The mean BP started decreasing approximately 2 hours post-infusion; BP remained elevated for 6 to 8 hours after the start of the ALIQOPA infusion. Optimal BP control should be achieved before starting each ALIQOPA infusion. Monitor BP pre- and post-infusion. Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of hypertension.

Non-infectious Pneumonitis: Non-infectious pneumonitis occurred in 5% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. Withhold ALIQOPA and conduct a diagnostic examination of a patient who is experiencing pulmonary symptoms such as cough, dyspnea, hypoxia, or interstitial infiltrates on radiologic exam. Patients with pneumonitis thought to be caused by ALIQOPA have been managed by withholding ALIQOPA and administration of systemic corticosteroids. Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of non-infectious pneumonitis.

Neutropenia: Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 24% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy. Serious neutropenic events occurred in 1.3%. Monitor blood counts at least weekly during treatment with ALIQOPA. Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of neutropenia.

Severe Cutaneous Reaction: Grade 3 and 4 cutaneous reactions occurred in 2.8% and 0.6% of 317 patients treated with ALIQOPA monotherapy respectively. Serious cutaneous reaction events were reported in 0.9%. The reported events included dermatitis exfoliative, exfoliative rash, pruritus, and rash (including maculo-papular rash). Withhold, reduce dose, or discontinue ALIQOPA depending on the severity and persistence of severe cutaneous reactions.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on findings in animals and its mechanism of action, ALIQOPA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. In animal reproduction studies, administration of copanlisib to pregnant rats during organogenesis caused embryo-fetal death and fetal abnormalities in rats at maternal doses as low as 0.75 mg/kg/day (4.5 mg/m2/day body surface area) corresponding to approximately 12% the recommended dose for patients. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential and males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for at least one month after the last dose.

Adverse Drug Reactions: Serious adverse reactions were reported in 44 (26%) patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions that occurred were pneumonia (8%), pneumonitis (5%) and hyperglycemia (5%). Adverse reactions resulted in dose reduction in 36 (21%) and discontinuation in 27 (16%) patients. The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions (≥20%) in ALIQOPA-treated patients were: hyperglycemia (54%), leukopenia (36%), diarrhea (36%), decreased general strength and energy (36%), hypertension (35%), neutropenia (32%), nausea (26%), thrombocytopenia (22%), and lower respiratory tract infections (21%).

Drug Interactions: Avoid concomitant use with strong CYP3A inducers. Reduce the ALIQOPA dose to 45 mg when concomitantly administered with strong CYP3A inhibitors.

Lactation: Advise women not to breastfeed. Advise a lactating woman not to breastfeed during treatment with ALIQOPA and for at least 1 month after the last dose.

Please see the full Prescribing Information of Aliqopa (copanlisib) Injection.

About Stivarga® (regorafenib)7
In April 2017, Stivarga was approved for use in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who have been previously treated with Nexavar® (sorafenib). In the United States, Stivarga is also indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and, if RAS wild-type, an anti-EGFR therapy. It is also indicated for the treatment of patients with locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who have been previously treated with imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate.

Regorafenib is a compound developed by Bayer. In 2011, Bayer entered into an agreement with Onyx, now an Amgen subsidiary, under which Onyx receives a royalty on all global net sales of regorafenib in oncology.

Important Safety Information for Stivarga

WARNING: HEPATOTOXICITY

• Severe and sometimes fatal hepatotoxicity has occurred in clinical trials.
• Monitor hepatic function prior to and during treatment.
• Interrupt and then reduce or discontinue STIVARGA for hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis, depending upon severity and persistence.

Hepatotoxicity: Severe drug-induced liver injury with fatal outcome occurred in STIVARGA-treated patients across all clinical trials. In most cases, liver dysfunction occurred within the first 2 months of therapy and was characterized by a hepatocellular pattern of injury. In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), fatal hepatic failure occurred in 1.6% of patients in the STIVARGA arm and in 0.4% of patients in the placebo arm. In gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), fatal hepatic failure occurred in 0.8% of patients in the STIVARGA arm. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), there was no increase in the incidence of fatal hepatic failure as compared to placebo.

Liver Function Monitoring: Obtain liver function tests (ALT, AST, and bilirubin) before initiation of STIVARGA and monitor at least every 2 weeks during the first 2 months of treatment. Thereafter, monitor monthly or more frequently as clinically indicated. Monitor liver function tests weekly in patients experiencing elevated liver function tests until improvement to less than 3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) or baseline values. Temporarily hold and then reduce or permanently discontinue STIVARGA, depending on the severity and persistence of hepatotoxicity as manifested by elevated liver function tests or hepatocellular necrosis.

Infections: STIVARGA caused an increased risk of infections. The overall incidence of infection (Grades 1-5) was higher (32% vs 17%) in 1142 STIVARGA-treated patients as compared to the control arm in randomized placebo-controlled trials. The incidence of grade 3 or greater infections in STIVARGA treated patients was 9%. The most common infections were urinary tract infections (5.7%), nasopharyngitis (4.0%), mucocutaneous and systemic fungal infections (3.3%) and pneumonia (2.6%). Fatal outcomes caused by infection occurred more often in patients treated with STIVARGA (1.0%) as compared to patients receiving placebo (0.3%); the most common fatal infections were respiratory (0.6% vs 0.2%). Withhold STIVARGA for Grade 3 or 4 infections, or worsening infection of any grade. Resume STIVARGA at the same dose following resolution of infection.

Hemorrhage: STIVARGA caused an increased incidence of hemorrhage. The overall incidence (Grades 1-5) was 18.2% in 1142 patients treated with STIVARGA vs 9.5% with placebo in randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The incidence of grade 3 or greater hemorrhage in patients treated with STIVARGA was 3.0%. The incidence of fatal hemorrhagic events was 0.7%, involving the central nervous system or the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or genitourinary tracts. Permanently discontinue STIVARGA in patients with severe or life-threatening hemorrhage and monitor INR levels more frequently in patients receiving warfarin.

Gastrointestinal Perforation or Fistula: Gastrointestinal perforation occurred in 0.6% of 4518 patients treated with STIVARGA across all clinical trials of STIVARGA administered as a single agent; this included eight fatal events. Gastrointestinal fistula occurred in 0.8% of patients treated with STIVARGA and in 0.2% of patients in the placebo arm across randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Permanently discontinue STIVARGA in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation or fistula.

Dermatological Toxicity: In randomized, placebo-controlled trials, adverse skin reactions occurred in 71.9% of patients with STIVARGA arm and 25.5% of patients in the placebo arm including hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) also known as palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (PPES) and severe rash, requiring dose modification. In the randomized, placebo-controlled trials, the overall incidence of HFSR was higher in 1142 STIVARGA-treated patients (53% vs 8%) than in the placebo-treated patients. Most cases of HFSR in STIVARGA-treated patients appeared during the first cycle of treatment. The incidences of Grade 3 HFSR (16% vs <1%), Grade 3 rash (3% vs <1%), serious adverse reactions of erythema multiforme (<0.1% vs 0%), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (<0.1% vs 0%) were higher in STIVARGA-treated patients. Across all trials, a higher incidence of HFSR was observed in Asian patients treated with STIVARGA (all grades: 72%; Grade 3:18%). Toxic epidermal necrolysis occurred in 0.02% of 4518 STIVARGA-treated patients across all clinical trials of STIVARGA administered as a single agent. Withhold STIVARGA, reduce the dose, or permanently discontinue depending on the severity and persistence of dermatologic toxicity.

Hypertension: Hypertensive crisis occurred in 0.2% in STIVARGA-treated patients and in none of the patients in placebo arm across all randomized, placebo-controlled trials. STIVARGA caused an increased incidence of hypertension (30% vs 8% in mCRC, 59% vs 27% in GIST, and 31% vs 6% in HCC). The onset of hypertension occurred during the first cycle of treatment in most patients who developed hypertension (67% in randomized, placebo-controlled trials). Do not initiate STIVARGA until blood pressure is adequately controlled. Monitor blood pressure weekly for the first 6 weeks of treatment and then every cycle, or more frequently, as clinically indicated. Temporarily or permanently withhold STIVARGA for severe or uncontrolled hypertension.

Cardiac Ischemia and Infarction: STIVARGA increased the incidence of myocardial ischemia and infarction (0.9% with STIVARGA vs 0.2% with placebo) in randomized placebo-controlled trials. Withhold STIVARGA in patients who develop new or acute cardiac ischemia or infarction, and resume only after resolution of acute cardiac ischemic events if the potential benefits outweigh the risks of further cardiac ischemia.

Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS): Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS), a syndrome of subcortial vasogenic edema diagnosed by characteristic finding on MRI occurred in one of 4800 STIVARGA-treated patients across all clinical trials. Perform an evaluation for RPLS in any patient presenting with seizures, severe headache, visual disturbances, confusion, or altered mental function. Discontinue STIVARGA in patients who develop RPLS.

Wound Healing Complications: Treatment with STIVARGA should be stopped at least 2 weeks prior to scheduled surgery. Resuming treatment after surgery should be based on clinical judgment of adequate wound healing. STIVARGA should be discontinued in patients with wound dehiscence.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: STIVARGA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. There are no available data on STIVARGA use in pregnant women. Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential and males with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with STIVARGA and for 2 months after the final dose.

Nursing Mothers: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from STIVARGA, do not breastfeed during treatment with STIVARGA and for 2 weeks after the final dose.

Most Frequently Observed Adverse Drug Reactions in mCRC (≥30%): The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions (≥30%) in STIVARGA-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in mCRC, respectively, were: asthenia/fatigue (64% vs 46%), pain (59% vs 48%), decreased appetite and food intake (47% vs 28%), HFSR/PPE (45% vs 7%), diarrhea (43% vs 17%), mucositis (33% vs 5%), weight loss (32% vs 10%), infection (31% vs 17%), hypertension (30% vs 8%), and dysphonia (30% vs 6%).

Most Frequently Observed Adverse Drug Reactions in GIST (≥30%): The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions (≥30%) in STIVARGA-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in GIST, respectively, were: HFSR/PPE (67% vs 12%), pain (60% vs 55%), hypertension (59% vs 27%), asthenia/fatigue (52% vs 39%), diarrhea (47% vs 9%), mucositis (40% vs 8%), dysphonia (39% vs 9%), infection (32% vs 5%), decreased appetite and food intake (31% vs 21%), and rash (30% vs 3%).

Most Frequently Observed Adverse Drug Reactions in HCC (≥30%): The most frequently observed adverse drug reactions (≥30%) in STIVARGA-treated patients vs placebo-treated patients in HCC, respectively, were: pain (55% vs 44%), HFSR/PPE (51% vs 7%), asthenia/fatigue (42% vs 33%), diarrhea (41% vs 15%), hypertension (31% vs 6%), infection (31% vs 18%), decreased appetite and food intake (31% vs 15%).

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning for Stivarga (regorafenib).

About NEXAVAR® (sorafenib) Tablets8
NEXAVAR is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma and patients with locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, differentiated thyroid carcinoma refractory to radioactive iodine treatment.8

Important Safety Information For NEXAVAR® (sorafenib) Tablets

Contraindications: NEXAVAR is contraindicated in patients with known severe hypersensitivity to sorafenib or any other component of NEXAVAR.

NEXAVAR in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel is contraindicated in patients with squamous cell lung cancer.

Cardiovascular Events: In the SHARP (HCC) study, the incidence of cardiac ischemia/infarction was 2.7% in NEXAVAR-treated patients compared with 1.3% for placebo-treated group.  In the TARGET (RCC) study, the incidence of cardiac ischemia/infarction was higher in the NEXAVAR-treated group (2.9%) compared with the placebo-treated group (0.4%). In the DECISION (DTC) study, the incidence of cardiac ischemia/infarction was 1.9% in the NEXAVAR-treated group compared with 0% in the placebo-treated group. Patients with unstable coronary artery disease or recent myocardial infarction were excluded from this study. Temporary or permanent discontinuation of NEXAVAR should be considered in patients who develop cardiovascular events.

Hemorrhage:  An increased risk of bleeding may occur following NEXAVAR administration. In the SHARP (HCC) study, the following bleeding adverse reactions were reported in the NEXAVAR-treated vs. placebo-treated patients, respectively: bleeding from esophageal varices (2.4% vs. 4%) and bleeding with fatal outcome at any site (2.4% vs. 4%).  In the TARGET (RCC) study, bleeding regardless of causality was reported in 15.3% of patients in the NEXAVAR-treated group and 8.2% of patients in the placebo-treated group. The incidence of CTCAE Grade 3 and 4 bleeding was 2% and 0%, respectively, in NEXAVAR-treated patients, and 1.3% and 0.2%, respectively, in placebo-treated patients. There was one fatal hemorrhage in each treatment group in the TARGET (RCC) study. In the DECISION (DTC) study, bleeding was reported in 17.4% of NEXAVAR-treated patients and 9.6% of placebo-treated patients; however, the incidence of CTCAE Grade 3 bleeding was 1% in NEXAVAR-treated patients and 1.4% in placebo-treated patients. There was no Grade 4 bleeding reported and there was one fatal hemorrhage in a placebo-treated patient.  If any bleeding necessitates medical intervention, permanent discontinuation of NEXAVAR should be considered.

Hypertension:  Monitor blood pressure weekly during the first 6 weeks and periodically thereafter, and treat, if required. In the SHARP (HCC) study, hypertension was reported in 9.4% of NEXAVAR-treated patients and 4.3% of patients in the placebo-treated group. In the TARGET (RCC) study, hypertension was reported in 16.9% of NEXAVAR-treated patients and 1.8% of patients in the placebo-treated group. In the DECISION (DTC) study, hypertension was reported in 40.6% of NEXAVAR-treated patients and 12.4% of placebo-treated patients. Hypertension was usually mild to moderate, occurred early in the course of treatment, and was managed with standard antihypertensive therapy. In cases of severe or persistent hypertension despite institution of antihypertensive therapy, consider temporary or permanent discontinuation of NEXAVAR.

Dermatologic Toxicities:  Hand-foot skin reaction and rash are the most common adverse reactions attributed to NEXAVAR. Management of dermatologic toxicities may include topical therapies for symptomatic relief, temporary treatment interruption and/or dose modification of NEXAVAR, or in severe or persistent cases, permanent discontinuation of NEXAVAR. There have been reports of severe dermatologic toxicities, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). These cases may be life-threatening. Discontinue NEXAVAR if SJS or TEN are suspected.

Gastrointestinal Perforation:  Gastrointestinal perforation was an uncommon adverse reaction and has been reported in less than 1% of patients taking NEXAVAR. Permanently discontinue NEXAVAR in the event of a gastrointestinal perforation.

Warfarin:  Infrequent bleeding or elevations in the International Normalized Ratio (INR) have been reported in some patients taking warfarin while on NEXAVAR. Monitor patients taking concomitant warfarin regularly for changes in prothrombin time (PT), INR, or clinical bleeding episodes.

Wound Healing Complications:  Temporary interruption of NEXAVAR therapy is recommended in patients undergoing major surgical procedures. 

Increased Mortality, Concomitant Administration with Carboplatin/Paclitaxel & Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer:  In a subset analysis of two randomized controlled trials in chemo-naïve patients with Stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer, patients with squamous cell carcinoma experienced higher mortality with the addition of NEXAVAR compared to those treated with carboplatin/paclitaxel alone (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.19–2.74) and gemcitabine/cisplatin alone (HR 1.22, 95% CI 0.82-1.80). NEXAVAR, in combination with gemcitabine/cisplatin, is not recommended in patients with squamous cell lung cancer. The safety and effectiveness of NEXAVAR has not been established in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

QT Interval Prolongation: NEXAVAR can prolong the QT/QTc interval.  QT/QTc interval prolongation increases the risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Avoid use in patients with congenital long QT syndrome. Monitor electrolytes and electrocardiograms in patients with congestive heart failure, bradyarrhythmias, drugs known to prolong the QT interval, including Class Ia and III antiarrhythmics. Correct electrolyte abnormalities (magnesium, potassium, calcium). Interrupt NEXAVAR if QTc interval is greater than 500 milliseconds or for an increase from baseline of 60 milliseconds or greater.

Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Sorafenib-induced hepatitis is characterized by a hepatocellular pattern of liver damage with significant increases of transaminases which may result in hepatic failure and death. Increases in bilirubin and INR may also occur. Liver function tests should be monitored regularly and in cases of increased transaminases without alternative explanation NEXAVAR should be discontinued.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity:  Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, NEXAVAR may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Sorafenib caused embryo-fetal toxicities in animals at maternal exposures that were significantly lower than the human exposures at the recommended dose of 400 mg twice daily. Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus. Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiation of NEXAVAR. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose of NEXAVAR. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential and pregnant partners to use effective contraception during treatment and for 3 months following the last dose of NEXAVAR.

Impairment of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Suppression in Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma:  NEXAVAR impairs exogenous thyroid suppression.  In the DECISION (DTC) study, 99% of patients had a baseline thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level less than 0.8 mU/L.  Elevation of TSH level above 0.5 mU/L was observed in 41% of NEXAVAR-treated patients as compared with 16% of placebo-treated patients.  For patients with impaired TSH suppression while receiving NEXAVAR, the median maximal TSH was 1.6 mU/L and 25% had TSH levels greater than 4.4mU/L.  Monitor TSH levels monthly and adjust thyroid replacement medication as need in patients with DTC.

Laboratory Abnormalities:  In the HCC study, the most common laboratory abnormalities observed in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, were hypoalbuminemia (59% vs. 47%), lymphopenia (47% vs. 42%), thrombocytopenia (46% vs. 41%), elevation in INR (42% vs. 34%), elevated lipase (40% vs. 37%), hypophosphatemia (35% vs. 11%), elevated amylase (34% vs. 29%), hypocalcemia (27% vs. 15%), and hypokalemia (9.5% vs. 5.9%).

In the RCC study, the most common laboratory abnormalities observed in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, were hypophosphatemia (45% vs. 11%), anemia (44% vs. 49%), elevated lipase (41% vs. 30%), elevated amylase (30% vs. 23%), lymphopenia (23% vs. 13%), neutropenia (18% vs. 10%), thrombocytopenia (12% vs. 5%), hypocalcemia (12% vs. 8%), and hypokalemia (5.4% vs. 0.7%).

In the DTC study, the most common laboratory abnormalities observed in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, were elevated ALT (59% vs. 24%), elevated AST (54% vs. 15%), and hypocalcemia (36% vs. 11%).The relative increase for the following laboratory abnormalities observed in NEXAVAR-treated DTC patients as compared to placebo-treated patients is similar to that observed in the RCC and HCC studies: lipase, amylase, hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia.

Most Frequently Observed Adverse Drug Reactions (≥20%):  The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of patients and at a higher rate in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, in the SHARP (HCC) study included: diarrhea (55% vs. 25%), fatigue (46% vs. 45%), abdominal pain (31% vs. 26%), weight loss (30% vs. 10%), anorexia (29% vs. 18%), nausea (24% vs. 20%), and hand-foot skin reaction (21% vs. 3%). Grade 3/4 adverse reactions were 45% vs. 32%. 

The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of patients and at a higher rate in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, in the TARGET (RCC) study included:  diarrhea (43% vs. 14%), rash/desquamation (40% vs. 16%), fatigue (37% vs. 28%), hand-foot skin reaction (30% vs. 7%), alopecia (27% vs. 3%), and nausea (23% vs. 19%), anorexia (29% vs. 18%), nausea (23% vs. 19%). Grade 3/4 adverse reactions were 38% vs. 28%.

The most common adverse reactions reported in ≥20% of patients and at a higher rate in the NEXAVAR arm versus the placebo arm, respectively, in the DECISION (DTC) study included: palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (PPES) (69% vs. 8%), diarrhea (68% vs. 15%), alopecia (67% vs. 8%), weight loss (49% vs. 14%), fatigue (41% vs. 20%), hypertension (41% vs. 12%), rash (35% vs. 7%), decreased appetite (30% vs. 5%), stomatitis (24% vs. 3%), nausea (21% vs. 12%), pruritus (20% vs. 11%), and abdominal pain (20% vs. 7%). Grade 3/4 adverse reactions were 65% vs 30%.

Drug Interactions:  Avoid concomitant use of strong CYP3A4 inducers, when possible, because inducers can decrease the systemic exposure of sorafenib. NEXAVAR exposure decreases when co-administered with oral neomycin. Effects of other antibiotics on NEXAVAR pharmacokinetics have not been studied.

Lactation: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child from NEXAVAR, advise lactating women not to breastfeed during treatment with NEXAVAR and for 2 weeks after the last dose.

For full prescribing information, visit http://labeling.bayerhealthcare.com/html/products/pi/Nexavar_PI.pdf.

About Oncology at Bayer
Bayer is committed to delivering science for a better life by advancing a portfolio of innovative treatments. The oncology franchise at Bayer includes five marketed products and several other assets in various stages of clinical development. Together, these products reflect the company's approach to research, which prioritizes targets and pathways with the potential to impact the way that cancer is treated.

About Bayer
Bayer is a global enterprise with core competencies in the life science fields of health care and nutrition. Its products and services are designed to benefit people by supporting efforts to overcome the major challenges presented by a growing and aging global population. At the same time, the Group aims to increase its earning power and create value through innovation and growth. Bayer is committed to the principles of sustainable development, and the Bayer brand stands for trust, reliability and quality throughout the world. In fiscal 2018, the Group employed around 117,000 people and had sales of 39.6 billion euros. Capital expenditures amounted to 2.6 billion euros, R&D expenses to 5.2 billion euros. For more information, go to www.bayer.us.

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© 2019 Bayer
BAYER, the Bayer Cross, Vitrakvi, Aliqopa, Nexavar, Stivarga and Xofigo are registered trademarks of Bayer.

Media Contact:
Rose Talarico, Tel. +1 862.404.5302
E-Mail: rose.talarico@bayer.com

Forward-Looking Statements
This release may contain forward-looking statements based on current assumptions and forecasts made by Bayer management. Various known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors could lead to material differences between the actual future results, financial situation, development or performance of the company and the estimates given here. These factors include those discussed in Bayer's public reports which are available on the Bayer website at www.bayer.com. The company assumes no liability whatsoever to update these forward-looking statements or to conform them to future events or developments. 

References

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  2. Karnitz LM, Zou L. Molecular Pathways: Targeting ATR in Cancer Therapy. Clin Cancer Res 2015;21(21):4780-5 doi 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-15-0479.
  3. Jackson, Stephen P, et al. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease. Nature 2009; 461:1071–1078. doi: 10.1038/nature08467.
  4. Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) capsules and solution for oral use [Prescribing Information]. Stamford, CT: Loxo Oncology Inc.; November 2018.
  5. XOFIGO® (radium-223 dichloride) Injection [Prescribing Information]. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, February 2018.
  6. AliqopaTM (copanlisib) for injection [Prescribing Information]. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, September 2017.
  7. Stivarga® (Regorafenib) tablets [Prescribing Information]. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, April 2017
  8. NEXAVAR® (sorafenib) [Prescribing Information]. Whippany, NJ: Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, December 2018.

PP-PF-ONC-US-0562-1                                                                                               05/19

Intended for U.S. Media Only

 

SOURCE Bayer